marinemammalblog:

Seal / Seehund by Georg Schwalbach (GS1311) on Flickr.

DID I DO THAT??

jtotheizzoe:

via artandsciencejournal:

Mineral Microscopy

Stephanie Bateman-Graham does mineral microscopy, or as she prefers to call it “using a low-powered digital toy microscope to take pictures of beautiful minerals”. In these works Bateman-Graham discovers the parts of nature that are weirdly similar to recognizable art styles — from Van Gogh impressionism to the fractured lines of Picasso. I’ve included her descriptions of the three works above:

Ecosystem (Moss Agate):  Do you see a mixed population of microbes living together in a complete ecosystem? Actually it’s a microscope view of the mineral Stringy Moss Agate from Lake Bonneville. The material is translucent which gives a watery feel to the image, but it is entirely solid crystal.

Heart of Stony Glass (Opalite): Microscope view of the Australian mineral Rosella Opalite. The light bounces around this veined and fractured crystalline material to reveal a heart and vascular system inside the stone. The amazing brushstrokes and textures in this image are all natural.

Fire Mountain (Lace Agate): A mountain burns in this microscope view of the mineral Laguna Lace Agate from Mexico. Also known as Crazy Lace Agate.

To see more of Bateman-Graham’s works, click here

- Lee Jones

This art really rocks. 

I love how both zooming out (see here) and zooming in on Earth can turn it into some of the finest abstract art we have. Neat huh?

jtotheizzoe:

staceythinx:

The winners of the ninth annual Olympus Bioscapes Digital Imaging Competition have been announced and they’re as good as you would expect given that they were selected from from nearly 2,000 entries from 62 countries. 

This year’s winner is by Ralph Grimm, a teacher from Australia who made this video of a colony of microscopic rotifers from a lily pad in his pond.

“Nature uses only the longest threads to weave her patterns, so that each small piece of her fabric reveals the organization of the entire tapestry.” - Richard Feynman

montereybayaquarium:

Mae, First Otter to Raise a Pup on Exhibit, Dies

We’re sad to report that Mae, an 11-year-old female sea otter who had been part of our sea otter exhibit since she was eight months old, died over the weekend from a seizure disorder whose cause is still unknown. Her seizures began suddenly just a few days before her death on Saturday afternoon, November 17. 

Mae was rescued as a two-day-old pup near Santa Cruz in April 2001, and raised by our Sea Otter Research and Conservation (SORAC) program team. She joined the sea otter exhibit in December 2001 when  it became clear that she was not acquiring the skills she needed to be returned to the wild. She was the first animal we’d added to the exhibit since 1986 – starting a new generation of exhibit animals as our original sea otters reached the end of their lives.

That wasn’t Mae’s only “first” with us. In 2010, she became the first surrogate mother otter to raise an orphaned pup on exhibit at the aquarium. Her pup, Kit, is now living at SeaWorld San Diego. Mae served as a companion animal to several otters as part of the SORAC program.

Her name – that of a truck-stop waitress with a screeching voice in John Steinbeck’s Grapes of Wrath – was chosen in another first-ever process. It was selected for her by the public in an online poll.

Mae, nicknamed “Mayhem” by her caretakers, was a vocal and feisty sea otter who would make direct eye contact with and stick her tongue out at trainers when displeased, according to staff who worked with her.  She was also an enthusiastic partner in training sessions, said Chris DeAngelo, associate curator of marine mammals.

“Mae definitely knew the most behaviors of any of our otters and was wonderful to teach new behaviors,” Chris said. “She was one of the first animals that new trainers learned to work with because she was very consistent and good with dealing with ‘trainer errors.’ We’ll all miss her terribly.”

Chris and the sea otter staff also called Mae “the monkey” because she would hold objects like ice molds and toys with her tail, leaving her paws open to accept whatever came next. While none of the other adult otters displayed this behavior, it was picked up by some of the pups Mae raised.

Senior Sea Otter Aquarist Cecelia Azhderian appreciated Mae’s playfulness.

“She loved big buckets,” Cecelia said “She could hardly wait for them to be filled with water before she’d get inside, even though she didn’t like the water hose, which she’d attack it if it came too close.” 

Our sea otter exhibit is currently closed for renovations and will reopen in mid-March. Exhibit otters Rosa and Abby and are being housed behind the scenes. 

Learn more about our SORAC program and how we’re helping save sea otters

ouch charlie!

ouch charlie!

(via julietajus67)

this is my next car guys!!!

this is my next car guys!!!

(via julietajus67)

jtotheizzoe:

M31 > Moon
If your eyes were sensitive enough, here’s how big the M31 galaxy in Andromeda would look next to the Moon. It’s our nearest galactic neighbor, but doesn’t give off enough surface light to be visible from down here on Earth with the unaided eye.
I’m not making this up, folks … these are Trufax™. Now go impress your friends!
(via APOD)

jtotheizzoe:

M31 > Moon

If your eyes were sensitive enough, here’s how big the M31 galaxy in Andromeda would look next to the Moon. It’s our nearest galactic neighbor, but doesn’t give off enough surface light to be visible from down here on Earth with the unaided eye.

I’m not making this up, folks … these are Trufax™. Now go impress your friends!

(via APOD)

whos taller ;)

whos taller ;)

(Source: on-display, via youmightfindyourself)

jtotheizzoe:

The world can be a very different place, and what’s impossible to one may be possible to another, depending on how you look at it.
Some lessons on surface tension and how to defy them.

jtotheizzoe:

The world can be a very different place, and what’s impossible to one may be possible to another, depending on how you look at it.

Some lessons on surface tension and how to defy them.

sciencesoup:

Waitomo Glowworm Caves

For over one hundred years, millions of tourists have flocked to the ancient limestone Waitomo Caves on New Zealand’s North Island, where stunning species of fungus gnat called Arachnocampa luminosa live. The genus is unique to New Zealand and Australia, and they are found in caves, grottoes, and other sheltered places. Arachnocampa means ‘spider-worm,’ as the gnat is known for the way their larvae hang strong vertical silk threads from the ceilings of their underground habitats. The threads are from one to fifty centimetres long and are studded with evenly spaced drops of sticky mucus, acting like fishing lines to lure in prey. Since the larvae are luminescent, the thousands of tiny threads light up cave ceilings like a starry sky. Other insects are attracted to the light and fly up—but then become ensnared in the sticky mucus, which contains proteins that researchers think may act as an anaesthetic. The larvae live this way for many months, trapping and devouring their prey, before becoming a shot-lived adult gnat.

(Image Credit: 1, 2)

IIIII HAVE BEEN HERE!!!!

sciencesoup:

Waitomo Glowworm Caves

For over one hundred years, millions of tourists have flocked to the ancient limestone Waitomo Caves on New Zealand’s North Island, where stunning species of fungus gnat called Arachnocampa luminosa live. The genus is unique to New Zealand and Australia, and they are found in caves, grottoes, and other sheltered places. Arachnocampa means ‘spider-worm,’ as the gnat is known for the way their larvae hang strong vertical silk threads from the ceilings of their underground habitats. The threads are from one to fifty centimetres long and are studded with evenly spaced drops of sticky mucus, acting like fishing lines to lure in prey. Since the larvae are luminescent, the thousands of tiny threads light up cave ceilings like a starry sky. Other insects are attracted to the light and fly up—but then become ensnared in the sticky mucus, which contains proteins that researchers think may act as an anaesthetic. The larvae live this way for many months, trapping and devouring their prey, before becoming a shot-lived adult gnat.

(Image Credit: 1, 2)

turnontuneoutdropin:

fuckyeahtattoos:

This is my octopus diagram done by Klem at O’Reillys Tattoo in Santa Cruz, CA. I’m a marine biology major, scuba dive certified, and work at an aquarium. I have been planning this tattoo for over 2 years. I chose Klem because I loved all his work and knew I’d trust him to put this beauty permanently on me. 

But where’s the key for that diagram? 
Please tell me “inner thigh.”

turnontuneoutdropin:

fuckyeahtattoos:

This is my octopus diagram done by Klem at O’Reillys Tattoo in Santa Cruz, CA. I’m a marine biology major, scuba dive certified, and work at an aquarium. I have been planning this tattoo for over 2 years. I chose Klem because I loved all his work and knew I’d trust him to put this beauty permanently on me. 

But where’s the key for that diagram? 

Please tell me “inner thigh.”

(via freshphotons)